For the half-year to 30 June 2014, the IPKat's regular team is supplemented by contributions from guest bloggers Alberto Bellan, Darren Meale and Nadia Zegze.

Two of our regular Kats are currently on blogging sabbaticals. They are David Brophy and Catherine Lee.

Monday, 17 January 2005

EX-YUGO MACEDONIA JOINS WPPT -- BUT WITH RESERVATIONS


The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia has deposited its instrument of accession to the WIPO Performances and Phonograms Treaty (WPPT) 1996. This means that the WPPT comes into force in ex-Yugo Mac on 20 March 2005. However, nothing in the Balkans is ever as simple as it seems. The instrument of accession contains the following declarations:

"The Republic of Macedonia shall not apply the provision on the criterion of publication in respect of the national treatment on protection of phonogram producers in accordance with Article 3 paragraph 3 from the WIPO Performances and Phonograms Treaty, in relation to the expressed reservation of the Republic of Macedonia on Article 5 paragraph 3 from the International Convention for the Protection of Performers, Phonogram Producers and Broadcasting Organizations (Rome Convention)".

"The Republic of Macedonia shall not apply the provision on single equitable remuneration for the performers and for the phonogram producers for direct or indirect use of phonograms published for commercial purposes for broadcasting or for any other communication to the public, in accordance with Article 15 paragraph 3 from WIPO Performances and Phonograms Treaty, in relation to the expressed reservation of the Republic of Macedonia on Article 16 paragraph (1)(a)(i) from the International Convention for the Protection of Performers, Phonogram Producers and Broadcasting Organizations (the Rome Convention)".
The IPKat notes that, according to Wikipedia, the part of Macedonia contained within Greece is 51% of historical Macedonia, while the ex-Yugoslavian (and Bulgaian) bits contains the balance. To simplify things, why not just call the Greek one Big Mac and the ex-Yugoslav one Small Mac?

Big Mac

Small Mac

1 comment:

Marek Lazewski said...

The concept can be used creatively for a country that IPkat should know well. Is it England, Britain, Great Britain or United Kingdom of Great Britain? I think the whole lot should be referred to as "Royal", "Royal with Cheese" and "Royal with Cheese XL" - this way one would remember which one is the larger and which the smaller.

Subscribe to the IPKat's posts by email here

Just pop your email address into the box and click 'Subscribe':