The team is joined by Guest Kats Rosie Burbidge, Stephen Jones, Mathilde Pavis, and Eibhlin Vardy, and by InternKats Verónica Rodríguez Arguijo, Hayleigh Bosher, Tian Lu and Cecilia Sbrolli.

Friday, 9 June 2017

AIPPI/AIPLA Event: Copyright in a digital age - US and UK perspectives

With the AmeriKat spending much of her time flicking between the US and UK this year, she has been enjoying some UK/US comparative legal analysis of the two IP systems.  Although there is much changing in the patent realm on both sides of the Atlantic, those changes do not compare with what is going on in copyright.   In the AmeriKat's view, copyright law is far more challenging than patent law and the old justification that the subject matter of patents makes patent law more difficult no longer flies.  The incredible developments in technology - how information is created, by what technological process, how information is accessed and where it is used - means the subject matter once the purvey of the patent world has crossed into the copyright realm.  And who is litigating big copyright cases? The big tech giants - Google, Oracle, Pandora and Facebook.

In recent years the EU has been out-pacing the US in copyright policy and reform.  Where does that leave things in the US and with this current administration?  Will the EU copyright developments facilitate an environment that enables tech-start ups to flourish?  Will the special relationship extend to matters of copyright law?

Well, now is your chance to dive into those questions at next week's joint AIPPI/AIPLA event on 15 June 2017 at 5:30 PM (6PM start) at Bird & Bird.  The event blurb states that:
"AIPPI UK is delighted to host a delegation from AIPLA (American Intellectual Property Association) for a joint discussion on copyright law in the digital age with a particular focus on exhaustion of rights and the development of digital marketplaces for pre-owned digital copies."
The IPKat's very own Eleonora Rosati and Maria Scungio (Locke Lord LLP) will be providing viewpoints from the UK and US, respectively.  After their exciting presentations, there will be an extended, lively debate and Q&A between AIPLA members and AIPPI's UK audience.  Drinks will be served afterwards.

The AmeriKat expects this event to book up quickly, so reserve your place here and see you next week!


2 comments:

THE US anon said...

I must take issue with the statement of:

"The incredible developments in technology - how information is created, by what technological process, how information is accessed and where it is used - means the subject matter once the purvey of the patent world has crossed into the copyright realm."

It is not only incorrect, but troubling so, to think that that a person charted with writing on the subject does not understand that the subject matter of what patents protect and what copyright protects has "crossed into."

The subject matter remains clearly different between the different areas of Intellectual Property protection.

What perhaps has "crossed into" (and certainly, this crossing has been going on now for many decades) is that a particular manufacture of the hand of man (as those terms are understood in the various Intellectual Property legal terrains), has multiple aspects, each of which may earn protections in the different IP areas.

This is most definitely NOT a matter of "subject matter" crossing from one IP terrain into another.

Patents still protect that which patents protect.
Copyrights still protects that which copyrights protect.

It is decidedly unhelpful to contribute to the view that somehow "subject matter" is "crossing into" one IP arena from another IP arena - and shows that the author lacks a grasp of what the subject matter in each STILL means.

Anonymous said...

this unnecessary comment, although correct in its onjective meaning, clearly define the concept of saltyiness and by no means has any respect for the author of the article.

Even a simple mind can understand that the "subject matter" in the contested sentence must be referred to the arising role of copyright in the technological field, rather than to a debate on what patent protects and what copyright protects.

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